COVID-19

90% healthcare workers at King George’s Medical University had antibodies against COVID-19

Test performed by the Department of Transfusion Medicine, it was discovered that 1,800 out of 2,000 healthcare workers at KGMU in Lucknow.
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Following a screening test performed by the Department of Transfusion Medicine, it was discovered that 1,800 out of 2,000 healthcare workers at King George’s Medical University (KGMU) in Lucknow had antibodies against COVID-19. According to a KGMU statement issued on Tuesday, screening was performed in the department of transfusion medicine by Professor Tulika Chandra under the supervision of the Honorable Vice-Chancellor of KGMU, Lt. General Bipin Puri.

Dr Sudhir Singh, a spokesman for the KGMU, said that some people were showing antibodies without having been infected with Covid. According to the findings, 90% of healthcare workers developed COVID-19 Immunoglobulin G (IgG) spike antibodies, while 10% did not. Among the 10% of healthcare workers who had received both doses of vaccination, 5% had received both doses.

Vaccination status is such that 68 percent of healthcare workers who tested positive for antibodies have received both vaccination doses. The other 11 percent haven’t been vaccinated yet.

41% of healthcare workers who received both doses of vaccination were never infected with COVID-19, indicating that their antibodies are primarily due to vaccination.

A total of 26% of workers who received both doses of vaccines had a history of infection. It was also determined that the majority of antibodies detected after infection were detected within four months of infection. The antibody status after a single dose of vaccination is comparable to that before vaccination.

“When a person is infected, memory cells in the body store the infection information. As a result, even if antibodies are not formed, it is assumed that memory cells will be able to fight the infection if the risk is reintroduced. However, the second wave saw a high number of reinfections, leading scientists to believe that memory cells did not function properly in them,” said Prof Tulika Chandra, head of the transfusion medicine department.

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